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The Bob Dylan Archive® highlights the unique artistry and worldwide cultural significance of Bob Dylan. Housed at the University of Tulsa’s Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum, the archive includes decades of never-before-seen handwritten manuscripts, notebooks and correspondence; films, videos, photographs and artwork; memorabilia; personal documents; unrecorded song lyrics and chords.

Artifact #34

Blood on the Tracks

Notebooks containing lyrics from Mr. Dylan’s 1975 album “Blood on the Tracks.”

Fans have long known about a mysterious notebook in which Mr. Dylan labored over songs for this 1975 album. But the archive has two more notebooks from that period, with new insights into “Tangled Up in Blue,” “Shelter From the Storm” and other classics.

ARTIFACT #78

Eat the Document

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Aliquam id lacus sem. Nunc justo lacus, blandit a ipsum in, hendrerit pharetra felis. Donec posuere, leo eget posuere feugiat, nulla quam sollicitudin tellus, ut dictum felis sem ac neque. Fusce interdum malesuada ullamcorper. Proin eu mauris at mi auctor iaculis sit amet at est. Pellentesque eget condimentum magna, in cursus dui. Praesent vehicula dolor purus, ac tempor lacus elementum id. Fusce viverra turpis varius tincidunt dapibus. Aenean nisi ligula, porttitor eget enim ac, gravida dignissim libero. Integer tincidunt sapien ac ante volutpat tempus non eu sapien. Fusce eget nibh nulla.

Artifact #02

Chronicles Vol. 1

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec interdum, ipsum non auctor interdum, erat lectus iaculis ligula, id dictum justo diam ac libero. Ut eget consequat quam, eget egestas quam. Vivamus ac nibh iaculis, posuere arcu vestibulum, tristique erat. In commodo non magna ut rhoncus. Etiam fermentum ac odio nec commodo. In lobortis eros et ornare ultrices. Quisque at nisi ut tortor blandit aliquam tincidunt volutpat turpis. Phasellus tempus cursus mollis. Donec aliquam urna non est finibus accumsan. Sed ultrices velit vel risus tincidunt convallis. Sed non nunc dolor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

Aliquam id lacus sem. Nunc justo lacus, blandit a ipsum in, hendrerit pharetra felis. Donec posuere, leo eget posuere feugiat, nulla quam sollicitudin tellus, ut dictum felis sem ac neque. Fusce interdum malesuada ullamcorper. Proin eu mauris at mi auctor iaculis sit amet at est. Pellentesque eget condimentum magna, in cursus dui. Praesent vehicula dolor purus, ac tempor lacus elementum id. Fusce viverra turpis varius tincidunt dapibus. Aenean nisi ligula, porttitor eget enim ac, gravida dignissim libero. Integer tincidunt sapien ac ante volutpat tempus non eu sapien. Fusce eget nibh nulla.

Artifact #46

The Supper Club

“Art must be an integral part of the struggle,” Charles White insisted. “It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. … It must ally itself with the forces of liberation.” Over the course of his four-decade career, White’s commitment to creating powerful images of African Americans—what his gallerist and, later, White himself described as “images of dignity”—was unwavering. Using his virtuoso skills as a draftsman, printmaker, and painter, White developed his style and approach over time to address shifting concerns and new audiences. In each of the cities in which he lived over the course of his career—Chicago, New York, and, finally, Los Angeles—White became a key figure within a vibrant community of creative artists, writers, and activists.

White’s far-reaching vision of a socially committed practice attracted promising young artists, including many artists of color, and he became one of the 20th century’s most important and dedicated teachers. Acclaimed contemporary artists David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall were among his many students: as Marshall reflected, “Under Charles White’s influence I always knew that I wanted to make work that was about something: history, culture, politics, social issues. … It was just a matter of mastering the skills to actually do it.”

Artifact #818

Tattoo Parlour

Fans have long known about a mysterious notebook in which Mr. Dylan labored over songs for this 1975 album. But the archive has two more notebooks from that period, with new insights into “Tangled Up in Blue,” “Shelter From the Storm” and other classics.

Charles White insisted. “It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. … It must ally itself with the forces of liberation.” Over the course of his four-decade career, White’s commitment 
to creating powerful images of African Americans—what his gallerist and, later, White himself described as “images 
of dignity”

Artifact #VIDEO

Video Artifact Test

Fans have long known about a mysterious notebook in which Mr. Dylan labored over songs for this 1975 album. But the archive has two more notebooks from that period, with new insights into “Tangled Up in Blue,” “Shelter From the Storm” and other classics.

Video #12

Thom Yorke’s Visit

White’s far-reaching vision of a socially committed practice attracted promising young artists, including many artists of color, and he became one of the 20th century’s most important and dedicated teachers.

A TREASURE CHEST FOR SCHOLARS

“Art must be an integral part of the struggle,” Charles White insisted. “It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. … It must ally itself with the forces of liberation.” Over the course of his four-decade career, White’s commitment to creating powerful images of African Americans—what his gallerist and, later, White himself described as “images of dignity”—was unwavering. Using his virtuoso skills as a draftsman, printmaker, and painter, White developed his style and approach over time to address shifting concerns and new audiences. In each of the cities in which he lived over the course of his career—Chicago, New York, and, finally, Los Angeles—White became a key figure within a vibrant community of creative artists, writers, and activists.

White’s far-reaching vision of a socially committed practice attracted promising young artists, including many artists of color, and he became one of the 20th century’s most important and dedicated teachers. Acclaimed contemporary artists David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall were among his many students: as Marshall reflected, “Under Charles White’s influence I always knew that I wanted to make work that was about something: history, culture, politics, social issues.

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